Help a Teen Visit Israel (Special Guest Post by Alexander Abramson)

Alexander Abramson runs the 2013 ING Miami Marathon
Alexander Abramson runs the 2013 ING Miami Marathon

I’m a runner. I’ve been running as long as I can remember, including my first half-marathon at age 12 and my first full marathon at 14. Running gives me energy, and makes me feel like I can accomplish anything.  I’m proud of my finishes, and even more proud that over the years I’ve raised almost $10,000 for charities like the Joe DiMaggio Childrens’ Hospital Foundation and Friendship Circle.  I’m Alexander Abramson, I’m 15, and a proud sophomore at Weinbaum Yeshiva High School in Boca Raton.

My mom suggested I try out for BILT, a program run by the National Council of Synaogue Youth.  It stands for Boys Israel Leadersthip Training, and I think it’s really sick that I got accepted.  BILT will let me visit Israel, train on IDF bases, and help out at camps for Israeli kids in Sderot who have to live with terrorist bombing attacks all the time. I think it’s going to change my life, and help me understand what I can do for Israel and the Jewish people when I get older.

I need your help to attend BILT.  I”ve got an ambitious goal of raising $3,000 to participate, and I’m going to prepare by learning a lot more about Israel’s history, geography, and culture. Please help me by sponsoring me for this program. Click here to visit my sponsor page.

Thanks,

Alexander Abramson

P.S. Thanks to my Dad for allowing me to post this on his website.

P.P.S. Here are some links to videos my sister made of my last two marathons:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqV5TvNNWEM

Rabbi Israel Meir Kahan, The Chofetz Chaim (Jewish Biography as History)

Israel Meir Kagan (photo courtesy Baruch Chafetz via Wikimedia Commons)
Israel Meir Kagan (photo courtesy Baruch Chafetz via Wikimedia Commons)

Rabbi Israel Meir Kagan, better known as the Chofetz Chaim for his classic work on the sanctity of speech, was one of the major Rabbinic leaders of the late 19th and early 20th century.

To view the Prezi associated with this lecture, click on the image below or here.

Classes Resume Tonight at Young Israel

Hello students–

We are scheduled to resume our lecture series this evening with a presentation on the Chofetz Chaim,one of the most influential Rabbinic thinkers of the late 19th and early 20th century. Rabbi Israel Meir Kagan is known principally for his dramatically creative analysis of the topic of forbidden speech (lashon ha-ra), and rose to prominence as a major scholar-leader of the Jewish people. 8:30 at Young Israel. Look forward to seeing you!

The Boundaries of the State of Israel (Essential Lectures in Jewish History)

128px-Is-map

This video describes the changes in the political boundaries of the State of Israel from its inception 1948 through the disengagement from Gaza in 2005. Part of the Essential Lectures in Jewish History series by Dr. Henry Abramson. To view the Prezi associated with this video please click here.

Jacob Rodrigues Pereira, Jewish Teacher of Deaf-Mute People (This Week in Jewish History)

Pereire with a student. Source: Wikimedia Commons
Pereire with a student. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jacob Rodrigues Periera (1715-1780) was the inventor of dactylology, a method for teaching deaf-mutes to communicate. A crypto-Jew from Portugal, his first student was his sister. His methodology received phenomenal acclaim, he received honors from the King of France and was named to both the Royal Society of London. This video is part of This Week in Jewish History videos by Dr. Henry Abramson, available at http://www.jewishhistorylectures.org.

To view the Prezi used in this video, please click here.

The Holocaust (Essential Lectures in Jewish History by Dr. Henry Abramson)

Entrance to Auschwitz. Photo by Petar Milosevic via Wikimedia Commons.
Entrance to Auschwitz. Photo by Petar Milosevic via Wikimedia Commons.

This is a brief academic presentation of the history of the Nazi attempt to destroy the Jews of Europe during World War II. Part of the Essential Lectures in Jewish History series by Dr. Henry Abramson.

To view the Prezi used in this lecture, please click here.

Heinrich Heine: Poet of Judenschmerz

Heinrich Heine, portrait by Moritz Daniel Oppenheim via Wikimedia Commons.
Heinrich Heine, portrait by Moritz Daniel Oppenheim via Wikimedia Commons.

Revered by many as Germany’s greatest poet, Heine struggled mightily with his Jewish identity in the culturally inimical milieu of the 19th century. This phenomenon, known as Judenschmerz, was widespread among 19th century western European Jews. Despite his 1825 conversion to Christianity, Heine maintained a long, albeit conflicted, relationship to his Jewish background. Part of the Jewish Biography as History lecture series by Dr. Henry Abramson.

To view the Prezi associated with this video, please click here.

Sarah Schenirer and the Revolution in Jewish Education for Women (This Week in Jewish History)

Sara_schenirer

Sarah Schenirer (1883-1935) founded the Bais Yaakov (Bet Ya’akov) school system for women. One of the most visionary educators of the twentieth century, her movement had global impact.

To view the Prezi associated with this lecture, please click here.

 

Benjamin Disraeli: Jewish-born Prime Minister of England

Benjamin Disraeli. Source: Wikimedia Commons.
Benjamin Disraeli. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Baptized at age 12 as the result of his father’s dispute with a synagogue, Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881) rose to prominence as a novelist and politician, serving several times as England’s Prime Minister.  Colorful and flamboyant, Disraeli dismissed his antisemitic critics by emphasizing, rather than downplaying, his Jewish origins.

The Beilis Affair of 1911-1913 (This Week in Jewish History) by Dr. Henry Abramson

Mendel Beilis via Wikimedia Commons.
Mendel Beilis via Wikimedia Commons.

The discovery of the mutilated body of a young boy in Kiev led to the false arrest of a Jewish laborer named Mendel Beilis. Ignoring the argument of investigating officers, the Russian government under Tsar Nicholas II pressed ahead with the prosecution of Beilis, arguing that the boy was murdered as part of a Passover-related Jewish plot. After two years’ imprisonment, Beilis was freed by a Ukrainian Jewry that could not be persuaded to agree with the Russian prosecutor. Part of the This Week in Jewish History series by Dr. Henry Abramson.